Mtn. Talk Monday: Pet Care Basics with Dr. Dustin Anderson, DVM

Are you thinking about getting a pet, or do you already own one? Spring is the season where we tend to see plenty of puppies and kittens around. So, it’s timely that in this episode of Mountain Talk Monday our guest is Dr. Dustin Anderson, DVM with the Animal Wellness Center in Pikeville, KY. Dr. Anderson and host Kelli Haywood discuss basic pet care, budget care, pet allergies and food, and the most common diseases of dogs and cats. Plus, listen to learn more about pet adoption and the efforts of the Appalachian SPCA.   We appreciate your sharing our program with your friends and comments are always welcome.

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Mountain Talk is WMMT’s twice-weekly community space for conversation, airing each Monday & Wednesday from 6-7 p.m.  Mountain Talk programs focus on a variety of topics related to life in the mountains, including: food, community issues, art, health, and more.  Click here to hear past programs.

MN&WR: Healthcare Access in the Mountains

  • Mimi Pickering explores what the dismantling of KYnect (state health insurance exchange means) by Gov. Matt Bevin means for Kentuckians and in particular the communities seeing positive benefits with the exchange.
  • The 4th Annual Spring Herb Walk was held recently at the Hindman Settlement School in Knott County, Kentucky.  Kelli Haywood attended and spoke with the walk leaders, students, and teachers in attendance about the mountain traditions of wild edibles and foraging for medicinal herbs and the opportunities this knowledge may provide for us in the future.

Kynect Herb

 

Having access to life saving healthcare in the eastern Kentucky mountains as in all of rural Appalachia has always been a struggle.  Obstacles to receiving proper healthcare are numerous including lack of doctors and especially specialty doctors, transportation issues, no insurance or low income, and no childcare.  Because of these barriers, eastern Kentucky is among some of the poorest in the nation for health outcomes.  In this episode of Mountain News & World Report, we examine how eastern Kentuckians have made a life within the limitations of this reality, and how sometimes we take our health into our own hands.  Not only this, but we see how healthcare has been a support to the economy in eastern Kentucky and how our old and new ways of receiving it cannot be ignored for our future.

In our first story, Mimi Pickering takes an in depth look at the recent dismantling of KyNect and the possible repercussions of this on eastern Kentucky.  In 2013, then Gov Steve Beshear established KyNect, a state-wide health insurance marketplace, and expanded Medicaid to include all people below certain income  levels.  In 2015, Matt Bevin was elected governor, and a major part of his campaign centered on a pledge  to end participation in the ObamaCare Medicaid expansion,  and to dismantle KyNect.  What do these policies and programs mean to us on the local level?

And for our final story, Kelli Haywood visited the 4th Annual Spring Herb Walk at the Hindman Settlement School in Knott County, Kentucky to learn more about the effort that knowledge of our communities’ traditional medicines gets passed down to the next generation.  In Appalachia, as in many rural and subsistence communities, people have long used herbs and folks remedies to heal themselves.  With access to modern medical care, are such folkways still useful today?

Mountain News & World Report is a bi-weekly production of WMMT, and new episodes air every other Thursday at 6pm on WMMT, with a repeat broadcast the following Sunday morning at 10:30.  To listen to previous episodes, check out our streaming archives.

 

Coal Report for May 18, 2016

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Image courtesy of meepoohfoto at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Monday, May 16th a coal miner died in Arch Coal’s Leer Mine in Grafton, West Virginia. Mining officials are conducting a full investigation of the death reported at 4:15am. The miner’s name has not been released. He passed away while operating a locomotive. Cause of death is suspected to be from a medical condition.

(Quote) “It is absolutely imperative that mine operators conduct examinations of mines each day to assure they are in compliance with the “Rules to Live By” and examination standards linked to most of the mining deaths. While we have seen some progress, we are not where we need to be if these fatalities are to be prevented,” (End Quote) said Joseph A. Main, assistant secretary of labor for mine safety and health addressing the Mine Safety and Health Administration’s (MSHA) decision to increase enforcement of its “Rules to Live By” initiative. Continue reading Coal Report for May 18, 2016

Mtn. Talk Monday: Row by Row with Author Katherine J. Black

In her book Row by Row: Talking with Kentucky Gardeners author and gardener, Katherine J. Black asks the question – Why are gardeners compelled to do the hard work of gardening?  What she discovered from speaking with gardeners throughout Kentucky is that gardening and life intersect more than we might notice at first glance.  In this episode of Mountain Talk Monday, WMMT’s Mimi Pickering traveled to Lexington to talk with Black in her home and garden about her book and how the idea for a simple oral history project turned into a book that is truly an illustration of how growing gardens of all types ultimately brings new levels of personal growth for those who choose to take it on.  We have also included a bonus track on which Black reads two chapters from Row by Row: Talking with Kentucky Gardeners which is available from Ohio University Press.

Interview with Katherine J. Black

 

Bonus Track – Two Selected Readings

Kate Black & strawberry sign Nyoka

Mountain Talk is WMMT’s twice-weekly community space for conversation, airing each Monday & Wednesday from 6-7 p.m.  Mountain Talk programs focus on a variety of topics related to life in the mountains, including: food, community issues, art, health, and more.  Click here to hear past programs.

Coal Report for May 11, 2016

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“Old Coal Mine Entrance” – Image courtesy of Victor Habbick at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Last week, Arch Coal filed its restructuring plan in federal court.  Arch filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy this past January.  The restructuring plan provides language allowing  Arch to honor their previous commitments on employee benefits and meeting minimum funding requirements for its pension plans.  Wyoming taxpayers worry about the absence of a plan for the company’s self-bonded reclamation obligations at the tune of $485 million.  In order to obtain a mining permit a company must obtain reclamation bonds.  Some larger companies choose to make bonds with their assets as collateral as Arch has with a portion of its clean-up obligation.  During the Chapter 11 filings, Arch gave 19% of its cleanup costs to the state of Wyoming in a deal made with the Department of Environmental Quality.  This deal ends when the company emerges restructured.  Logan Bonacorsi, and Arch spokeswoman told the Casper Star Tribune (quote) “As part of the restructuring process, we will be evaluating ways to satisfy the bonding requirements on our reclamation obligations when we emerge.  That process will take time and is ongoing.”  (end quote) Continue reading Coal Report for May 11, 2016

Mtn. Talk Monday: Addiction Recovery with Jon & Sheena

It is too familiar with the entire nation, maybe the entire world that parts of Appalachia are experiencing widespread addiction to opiates and their counterparts throughout all ages of the population.  The problem outweighs the resources we have to deal with it.   In this edition of Mountain Talk Monday, host Kelli Haywood speaks with Jon & Sheena, a married couple who have shared the disease of addiction throughout their entire relationship and have gone through the process of recovery together.  They share how they reached their lowest low, the steps they took to regain their health, and what it is like living daily as a recovering addict and parenting their four children.  Jon & Sheena are active in helping many recovering addicts find their path to wellness and reside in Letcher County, Kentucky.

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Mountain Talk is WMMT’s twice-weekly community space for conversation, airing each Monday & Wednesday from 6-7 p.m.  Mountain Talk programs focus on a variety of topics related to life in the mountains, including: food, community issues, art, health, and more.  Click here to hear past programs.

MN&WR: Reasons to Celebrate

  • George Ella Lyon, the current Poet Laureate, is one of many who have hailed from eastern Kentucky.  Benny Becker visits her hometown of Harlan to attend the George Ellabration – a celebration of her life and work.
  • Clinch River Valley Initiative, a coalition of public and private groups, are celebrating the successful completion of the first stage of having 130 miles of the Clinch River declared a state park.  Rich Kirby and Mimi Pickering were there.
  • Kelli Haywood sat down with Democratic candidate for a U.S. Senate seat in Kentucky, Sellus Wilder, who speaks about celebrating the accomplishments of the everyday people in his documentary film – “The End of the Line.”
  • In our Humans of Central Appalachia featured story, Elizabeth Ramey talks of the celebrations held within families and homes. 

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An act of marking one’s pleasure at an important event or occasion by engaging in enjoyable, typically social, activity… that is the formal definition of a celebration.  As we know, sometimes the need for having a celebration precedes the cause.  In this episode of Mountain News & World Report, we are looking at – Reasons to Celebrate.  Our show begins in Harlan County, where Benny Becker met George Ella Lyon, a native East Kentuckian, who is currently serving as the state’s poet laureate.  Her works spans many genres including poetry, novel, picture books, and children’s literature.

For our next segment, we visit the small towns nestled along the banks of the Clinch River in Virginia.  WMMT Contributor Rich Kirby takes us there to note the celebration of the Clinch River Valley Initiative.   A coalition of public and private groups sought to have a patchwork of land spread across 130 miles of the Clinch River declared as a state park in spite of its unconventional layout  to help the area realize its potential as a major tourist attraction.

Documentary filmmaker, Sellus Wilder, who is running for the democratic nomination for Kentucky’s U.S. Senate seat, visited WMMT studios during his recent driving tour of eastern Kentucky.  His new documentary, “The End of the Line“ tells the story of how grassroots organizing defeated  the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline, and the film celebrates the power of everyday people, working together.  WMMT does not endorse political candidates, but as a public service, we welcome interviews with anyone running for political office.  Kelli Haywood spoke with Sellus Wilder on April 25th when he passed through Whitesburg to meet with local citizens and community leaders.

For the final piece, we add the voice of Elizabeth Ramey as part of WMMT’s ongoing collaboration with Malcolm J. Wilson and Humans of Central Appalachia. Elizabeth’s story brings our exploration of celebration home to family.

Mountain News & World Report is a bi-weekly production of WMMT, and new episodes air every other Thursday at 6pm on WMMT, with a repeat broadcast the following Sunday morning at 10:30.  To listen to previous episodes, check out our streaming archives.

Coal Report for May 4, 2016

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The U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration or MSHA is revamping its approach to coal mining inspections as the industry continues in a downturn and other types of mines, such as metal and non-metal mining are seeing an increase in both production and mine fatalities. Joseph Main, Assistant Secretary of Labor for MSHA cited the approach as a reduction in both inspections and administrative staff. Main said (quote), “The new mining environment has demanded a different approach. In practice, any specific reductions in inspections would be the result of planning by district leaders.” (end quote) However, industry leaders and politicians in coal producing areas state that inspections are still an undue burden to the industry and have actually increased in some cases. Luke Popovich, spokesman for the National Mining Association, said he had not noticed any significant increase in inspections, but the agency’s approach remained (quote) “intrusive,” and “many mines have upwards of 7, 8 or more inspectors in the mines at the same time, according to our safety expert.” (end quote) Continue reading Coal Report for May 4, 2016