Coal Report for April 19, 2017

 

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Dennis Fillinger, age 62, of Harts, W. Va. lost his life April 6th to injuries sustained while working underground as section foreman for C K Coal Corporation’s Mine No. 5 in Mingo County in southern West Virginia. On February 23, Fillinger was struck by a piece of rock “approximately 3 feet wide by 2 feet long by 3 to 4 inches thick,” the Mine Safety and Health Administration reports. He was administered first aid and then transported to a local medical center, where he remained hospitalized until his passing. Fillinger had 38 years’ total experience in coal mining, but had worked only 10 weeks at the C K Coal operation. WMMT would like to send our condolences to Fillinger’s family, friends, and co-workers.

 

A Coal Company Is Planning A Major Solar Project on a Former Kentucky Strip Mine

 

How Asian Politics Could Affect U.S. Coal

 

The Coal Report is a weekly production of WMMT. It is assembled from newspapers and press services and reports coal-related material as these sources give it. It does not represent the opinion of WMMT on the matters discussed. Our aim is to reflect both local developments regarding coal and the big picture we’re a part of. For feedback, comments, or questions, email [email protected]

Coal Report for April 12, 2017

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It may seem somewhat paradoxical, Kentucky’s Coal Mining Museum located in Harlan County being powered by solar, but as of last week work began to install solar panels that the museum operators hope will save them between $8,000-$10,000 yearly in costs. Brandon Robinson, communications director of Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College, which owns the museum, told WYMT-TV (quote), “It is a little ironic. But you know, coal and solar and all the different energy sources work hand-in-hand. And, of course, coal is still king around here.” (end quote) Tre Sexton the owner of Bluegrass Solar located in Whitesburg who is installing the panels told EKB-TV (quote) “I know the irony is pretty prevalent. Continue reading Coal Report for April 12, 2017

Mtn. Talk Monday: Colorectal Cancer Awareness with the UK Rural Cancer Prevention Center

Did you know Kentucky ranks 2nd in the US for the number of colon cancer cases only behind West Virginia? However, when it comes to deaths from colorectal cancer, we move to number 1! There are lots of factors at play including, our genetics, our environment, our diet, and more. In this episode, host Kelli Haywood talks with Tom Collins of the UK Rural Cancer Prevention Center about how you can beat the odds! Listen today and share the link with a friend.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Prevention Video from Elisia Cohen on Vimeo.

Mountain Talk is WMMT’s twice-weekly community space for conversation, airing each Monday & Wednesday from 6-7 p.m.  Mountain Talk programs focus on a variety of topics related to life in the mountains, including: food, community issues, art, health, and more.  Click here to hear past programs.

Coal Report for April 5, 2017

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Joseph W. Partin aged 33 lost his life at the Green Hill Mining No. 51 surface mine March 30th, when a 15 foot tall section of rock collapsed.  Partin was performing maintenance work.  Federal inspection records reveal no serious violations at the mine since 2005.  This is the second death occurring at eastern Kentucky mines in 2017, matching the total deaths for all of 2016.  WMMT offers our condolences to the family, friend, and co-workers of Mr. Partin.

Black Lung Update: Federal Researchers Seek Allies in Appalachia

Lawmakers Ask Trump for More Black Lung Funding

The Coal Report is a weekly production of WMMT. It is assembled from newspapers and press services and reports coal-related material as these sources give it. It does not represent the opinion of WMMT on the matters discussed. Our aim is to reflect both local developments regarding coal and the big picture we’re a part of. For feedback, comments, or questions, email [email protected]

MN&WR: Bringing the Past Forward

  • Mimi Pickering and Benny Becker report on how the digital divide is affecting one east Kentucky community and how they’re working to remedy the situation through working toward access to true broadband internet services.
  • The Kentucky Homebirth Coalition is a grassroots organization who have been working diligently to pass legislation to license certified professional midwives to fill some of the void when it comes to access to prenatal and birthing care throughout the state. Kelli Haywood shares the story.
Baby C. born at home in Pike County, Kentucky attended by a CPM.

Baby C. born at home in Pike County, Kentucky attended by a CPM.

Campbell's Branch

In these mountains, we take a special kind of interest in our traditions and our culture.  But, adapting this strong identity to the demands of modernity can sometimes be a challenge.  How do we preserve the ways that define us while at the same time moving our communities forward?

 

It seems with every passing day there is another reason why we need high speed, high capacity internet if our economy is going to revive and our communities thrive.  Yet rural America continues to lag behind metropolitan areas in access to true broadband, and the Appalachian mountains are no exception. For our first story Mimi  Pickering and Benny Becker reports on how the digital divide is affecting one east Kentucky community (Campbell’s Branch) and how they’re working to remedy the situation.

 

Going back just a few generations in Appalachia, you’ll find that most women were having babies in their homes instead of the hospital like most American women do today.  In fact, Mary Breckinridge pioneered the practice of nurse midwifery right here in the eastern Kentucky hills through the Frontier Nursing Service.  At the time, Breckinridge and her midwives did better than physicians in the hospitals across the country at making sure moms and babies were as healthy as possible through pregnancy and birth. For our second story, WMMT’s Kelli Haywood finds that a grassroots group of Kentuckians called the Kentucky Homebirth Coalition are hoping to make homebirth, once again, the typical method in the Commonwealth. Of Kentucky’s 120 counties more than half are without an obstetrician or other provider for prenatal, birth, and postpartum care, according to the Kentucky Medical Association. KHBC hopes that licensure will increase access to homebirth for women who are experiencing a low risk pregnancy. However, hospitals and obstetricians are wary of its safety.

Mountain News & World Report is a bi-weekly production of WMMT, and new episodes air every other Thursday at 6pm on WMMT, with a repeat broadcast the following Sunday morning at 10:30.  To listen to previous episodes, check out our streaming archives.

Mtn Talk Monday: The Get Together – A Multicultural Symposium

When people think of Central Appalachia these days, it seems often the next words are “Trump Country”, or white working class. Is Central Appalachia homogenized? Are we a diverse group of people? What is the legacy of diversity in the coalfields of Appalachia? Big Sandy Community and Technical College in Prestonsburg, Kentucky is delving in to the answers at their symposium on March 30th from 8:30am – 4:30pm called – The Get Together. In this episode, host Kelli Haywood speaks with Janie Beverly and Greta Slone who are members of the Diversity Committee for the college and helped to put together the events for the symposium. The group talks about diversity in Appalachia and just where we are with that these days. To reserve seating for the symposium email [email protected]

Mountain Talk is WMMT’s twice-weekly community space for conversation, airing each Monday & Wednesday from 6-7 p.m.  Mountain Talk programs focus on a variety of topics related to life in the mountains, including: food, community issues, art, health, and more.  Click here to hear past programs.