WMMT's MOUNTAIN TALK

Welcome to the streaming archives for Mountain Talk, WMMT's weekly community conversation, airing Wednesday evenings at 6. In addition to providing space for What's Cookin' Now! and Art Matters, Mountain Talk features interviews with guests that cover a wide range of topics pertaining to life in these mountains, such as food, music, history, spirituality, and current events. Join us each Wednesday at six, and if you miss a program be sure to look for it here on wmmt.org.

Mountain Talk: It’s Good To Be Young in the Mountains

yitm

collage of images from people across the region posing with cards promoting the It’s Good 2 Be Young in the Mountains conference

In the latest edition of WMMT’s Mountain Talk, we hear from several of the organizers of the upcoming It’s Good 2 Be Young in the Mountains conference, which runs from Aug. 13 – 16 in Harlan, Ky.  The event has been billed as “the festival where a conference breaks out,” and is geared towards giving the youth of the region a voice in planning Appalachia’s future (though all ages are welcome).  In this broadcast, we hear from conference planners Annie Zomaya, Tanya Turner, Megan Epperson, and more (and we also hear a tune from Angaleena Presley, who is herself a native of Pike County, and who will be performing on Saturday night!).  For more information on the conference, or to sign up, check out their website.

Mountain Talk is WMMT’s twice-weekly community space for conversation, airing each Monday & Wednesay from 6-7 p.m.  Mountain Talk programs focus on a variety of topics related to life in the mountains: food; community issuesart; health; and more (click any of those links to hear streaming audio of past programs archived by topic).

Mountain Talk: Looking Back to the ‘War on Poverty’

a historic news clipping featuring Hollis West, a veteran of the ‘War on Poverty’ in southeast Ky. in the 1960’s

In this special edition of WMMT’s Mountain Talk, we bring you an hour-long program looking back on the “War on Poverty” of the 1960’s, and specifically, how it played out here in Appalachia.  When talked about, the War on Poverty is often written off as a failure.  But here especially as the SOAR initiative tries once again to tackle some of the serious structural economic problems facing eastern Kentucky, it’s worth looking back to the War on Poverty to ask–what really happened?  Was it really a complete failure?  What went wrong, what went right, and what can we learn from it?

In this program, we hear extended interviews with two veterans of the War on Poverty who were on the front lines in Eastern Kentucky: Hollis West and Robert Shaffer.  WMMT’s Sylvia Ryerson & Mimi Pickering sat down with them to reflect back on their time in the mountains and where they think conditions in the region stand today.

We also hear a story from the WMMT archives about how the turbulence in the Appalachian coal industry in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s–especially the issue of mechanization, which was eliminating thousands of jobs–helped lead, in part, to the War on Poverty.  This story was originally produced in 1993, by WMMT’s Maxine Kenny.

Also interspersed throughout the program are historic clips and recordings from the era, about the region and the War on Poverty itself.

Mountain Talk is WMMT’s twice-weekly community space for conversation, airing each Monday & Wednesay from 6-7 p.m.  Mountain Talk programs focus on a variety of topics related to life in the mountains: food; community issuesart; health; and more (click any of those links to hear streaming audio of past programs archived by topic).

Mountain Health Monthly, Program 2: Autism Awareness

autism-awareness-ribbon

As April was national Autism Awareness month, in this edition of WMMT’s Mountain Health Monthly, host Carrie Lee-Hall welcomes a variety of guests to the program to discuss autism, and some of the many issues surrounding the condition. Those guests include: Gwenna Pennell of the Letcher County Autism Awareness Advocates; Dawn Pennell, daughter to Gwenna and the mother of a child with Asperger’s Syndrome; and Tammy Cook, who works in special-education instructional learning at West Whitesburg Elementary School.

Mountain Health Monthly airs on the 4th Monday of every month at 6 p.m. on WMMT. Each show, host Carrie Lee-Hall (a licensed nurse practicioner) welcomes local guests of all kinds to discuss health issues important to mountain communities. To hear past shows, check out our streaming archives.

Mountain Health Monthly, Program 1: Nutrition

nutrition

WMMT is excited to have a brand-new, monthly show in our lineup!  Mountain Health Monthly now airs on the 4th Monday of every month, and in it, host Carrie Lee-Hall welcomes guests from throughout the local medical community to talk about health issues important to us here in the mountains.  Carrie is a Family Nurse Practicioner & Nurse Midwife at Mountain Comprehensive Health Corporation, and a graduate of Frontier Nursing University.

In this first broadcast, Carrie welcomes guests Jackie Fraley (a registered dietician from Appalachian Regional Hospital) and Jackson Davis (a Nurse Practicioner student at FNU) to talk about nutrition.  They discuss both some of the challenges we face to proper nutrition here in the coalfields, as well as opportunities & methods by which local folks could adopt healthier diets.  Push “play” to stream the audio above.

SPECIAL NOTE: Tune into a brand-new episode of Mountain Health Monthly this Monday, April 27, at 6 p.m. on WMMT!  This month’s show will discuss autism & autism awareness.  You can stream the broadcast live, from wherever you are, by clicking listen live at right!

Mountain Talk: The 2015 Growing Appalachia Conference

growing-app-mt-talk

Valerie Horn of Grow Appalachia & the Appal-TREE project (L) and Sister Kathy Curtis of the Floyd Co. Farmers’ Market discuss the upcoming Growing Appalachia conference set for March 21 in Prestonsburg, Ky.

In this edition of WMMT’s Mountain Talk, we hear from a variety of guests involved in local agriculture here in the mountains about the 2015 Growing Appalachia conference, which is set for Saturday, March 21st in Prestonsburg, Ky.  The conference consists of a full day of workshops centered around small-scale mountain farming, energy efficiency, and renewables.  To learn more about it, in this program host Elizabeth Sanders welcomes a diverse group of local guests: Jessie Skaggs, who’s helping to organize the conference; Valerie Horn (of Grow Appalachia & the Appal-TREE project); Sister Kathy Curtis (of the Floyd Co. Farmers’ Market); Hilary Neff (also of Appal-TREE); Mark Walden (of Grow Appalachia); and Jonathan Hootman (part owner of Roundabout Music Company, a new co-operatively owned Whitesburg business).

The conference runs from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the 21st, and will be held at the Jenny Wiley Convention Center in Prestonsburg.  It’s being sponsored by the Big Sandy chapter of Kentuckians for the Commonwealth.  For more information or to sign up, click here.

Mountain Talk is WMMT’s twice-weekly community space for conversation, airing each Monday & Wednesay from 6-7 p.m.  Mountain Talk programs focus on a variety of topics related to life in the mountains: food; community issuesart; health; and more (click any of those links to hear streaming audio of past programs archived by topic).

Mountain Talk: New Ideas for Kentucky’s Economy

IMG_7486

(l-r) Sara Pennington, Eric Dixon, & host Mimi Pickering in the WMMT studio

Here in the midst of Kentucky’s legislative session, on this episode of WMMT’s Mountain Talk, we hear about a number of bills being heard in the General Assembly that could have an impact on Kentucky’s working families and the state’s economy as a whole.  Host Mimi Pickering is joined by guests from across the state, including Eric Dixon, Sara Pennington, & Tanya Turner (who all live in the Whitesburg area), as well as Shekinah Lavalle (of Louisville) and Jessica Hays Lucas (of Lexington).  Among other issues and bills, they discuss the Clean Energy Opportunity Act, a state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), and the idea of increasing the minimum wage.  Our guests also let listeners know how their voices could be heard on bills important to them.

To hear more episodes of WMMT’s Mountain Talk, check out our streaming archives.